Corns & Calluses

Corns & Calluses

Corns and calluses are areas of thickened skin that develop to protect that area from irritation. They occur when something rubs against the foot repeatedly or causes excess pressure against part of the foot. If the thickening of skin occurs on the bottom of the foot, it’s called a callus. If it occurs on the top of the foot (or toe), it’s called a corn.

They are not contagious but may become painful if they get too thick. In people with diabetes or decreased circulation, they can lead to more serious foot problems.

Corns often occur where a toe rubs against the interior of a shoe. Excessive pressure at the balls of the feet—common in women who regularly wear high heels—may cause calluses to develop on the balls of the feet. People with certain deformities of the foot, such as hammer toes, are prone to corns and calluses.

Corns and calluses typically have a rough, dull appearance. They may be raised or rounded, and they can be hard to differentiate from warts and sometimes cause pain.

Mild corns and calluses may not require treatment. If it isn’t bothering you, it can probably be left alone. It’s a good idea, though, to investigate possible causes. If your footwear is contributing to the development of a corn or callus, it’s time to look for other shoes.

If corns or calluses are causing pain and discomfort or inhibiting your daily life in any way, see a foot and ankle physician. Also, people with diabetes, poor circulation, or other serious illnesses should have their feet checked.

We invite you to call our office to schedule an appointment. You’ll find a tab to request an appointment and the phone number for our clinic conveniently located at the top of this page to get you started.

Contact us today!